February 27, 2013

The Good Boss Manifesto.

Marc Hogan was bet £1 that he couldn’t become a stand up comic in less than 12 months and perform a one man comedy show at the Edinburgh Comedy Festival for 21 nights. He won the bet!

Great customer service starts with good leadership this is my good boss manifesto.

  1. I’d like to think that I’m a nice person to work for, but in reality I am probably occasionally a pain in the neck (feel free to choose another part of your anatomy). Help me be a better boss by being honest with me.
  2. My most important asset is you, I need your enthusiasm, passion and knowledge I will always try to fairly reward these attributes.
  3. Whilst occasionally I have a grand breakthrough idea, usually the day-to-day grind of running of a business can be very mundane. If you have an idea that will make our lives easier, share it with me.
  4. Your ideas are crucial to our success, I will always encourage good ideas, however sometimes I have to make the difficult decision not to support all ideas (including my own).
  5. My job is a tight ropewalk between being too assertive and not assertive enough.
  6. To lead, one must be confident and believe they are right however I also understand that sometimes I may be wrong I will strive to teach all of us the same lesson.
  7. I understand that nobody is perfect and we all make mistakes, I will try not to play the blame game, let us deal with mistakes as effectively and painlessly as possible, and then learn from them.
  8. I promise to listen if you promise too.
  9. Problems to be solved in private, successes celebrated in public.
  10. In challenging times it always very easy to focus on the negative, I will always try and look for the positive in any situation.
  11. You will always be sure where you stand with me, there is no hidden agenda.
  12. Sometimes my role is to shield you from external pressures and pressures from above, please understand that I will always fight for the best outcome for my people.
  13. In high-pressure situations I may be short with you, I apologise in advance, I will always aim to be polite and treat you how I would like to be treated.
  14. We would not be here if it wasn’t for our customers, it is up to all of us to ensure that we do our very best to help our customers. I am never too busy to deal with the customer.


Click here
to watch Marc’s showreel. If you would like to find out more about Marc, visit www.marchoganlive.com or to book him for a speaking event please contact your favourite speaker bureau.


 

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  • Filed under: Blog Posts — marchogan @ 12:56 pm
February 5, 2013

Promotion or Relegation

Marc Hogan was bet £1 that he couldn’t become a stand up comic in less than 12 months and perform a one man comedy show at the Edinburgh Comedy Festival 21 nights. He won the bet!

To understand what your customers really think of you, here is a simple exercise.

First of all you need ask your customers to use a scale from 0 to 10 to rate how likely they would be to recommend you to a friend or colleague.

Customers who give you a 9 or 10 (well done, by the way) are what we call, “promoters”.  They’re the ones who would generally recommend you to a friend or colleague.

People who score you 6 or less are known as “detractors”.  They are likely to make negative rumblings about your brand. A score of 7 and 8 would come from the “passives” they don’t have strong positive or negative feelings about you (a bit like how I feel about Sweden).

Once you’ve asked the question, you can use this information to calculate your company’s Net Promoter Score (NPS).  Simply take the percentage of your customers who scored you 9 or 10 and subtract the percentage of customers who scored you 6 or below.

Lego, Apple, American Express and HSBC are amongst 48% of large companies (with more than $500 million in revenues) who use NPS to improve customer satisfaction, retention and growth.

I like NPS as a tool. The reason it’s popular is it allows you to measure customer satisfaction and to benchmark against other companies.  By asking other probing questions you can get to the bottom of underlying reasons and make the necessary changes.

The thing is I bet there are a lot of companies out there who don’t actually know why their customers are their customers.  Sure they can give an educated guess, but they don’t actually know why.

The only way you’ll ever find out why a customer uses your product is to ask why, and then more importantly use that information to drive your company, your employees and your communication.


Click here
to watch Marc’s showreel. If you would like to find out more about Marc, visit www.marchoganlive.com or to book him for a speaking event please contact your favourite speaker bureau.

 

Follow Marc_Hogan on Twitter

  • Filed under: Blog Posts — marchogan @ 11:28 am